World’s Loneliest Frog Might Get A Happy Ever After

We’ve already lost the dodo, the quagga, and the Javan tiger. Recently even the Western black rhino met its end. Species are going extinct more than twice as fast as scientists discover new ones, so it’s now more important than ever that we try our very best to preserve those who remain.

With no mates left for him, one little Bolivian frog was doomed to be the last survivor of his species. But then one team of biologists — true Shakespearean romantics deep down in their hearts — hatched a matchmaking plan to find him a love connection that could very well save an entire species!

Once upon a time, in the deep dark corners of the Bolivian rainforest, lived a Sehuencas water frog with a wide brown body, big green eyes, and an orange chest holding an empty heart. He was alone. He had been for a very, very long time.

There, from the tropical freshwater marsh, he was captured by scientists who had never laid eyes on one of his kind before. To further study him, they brought the fat-bellied frog back to their labs.

Ever since that day, the frog had been living at the Cochabamba Natural History Museum where he was given the name “Romeo.” The question for the lonely frog was this: would he find his one true love? Or would “love be a smoke made with the fume of sighs?”

See, at first, researchers and frog experts assumed that Romeo was the very last Sehuencas water frog remaining on Earth. After all, his habitat has been greatly affected by deforestation and climate change…

But both the researchers and Romeo refused to give up hope. Their new goal for the next decade was to find him a Juliet. If the two got along, he would no longer be lonely, and if they really got along, they might be able to repopulate the Sehuencas species.

For the scientists, boosting the frog population was a beneficial goal in more ways than one: they’d save another species from extinction, further study these little guys, and restore balance in the delicate ecosystem of the Amazon rainforest.

Thus, the biologists got to work; they searched endlessly throughout the forest and even created a profile for Romeo on Match.com. Still, for an entire decade, “one” remained the loneliest number.

Zoologist Teresa Camacho then led a frog-search expedition in December of 2018. She and her team would stick their hands in creeks and feel for water frogs since the creatures can’t easily be spotted underwater.

“We were tired, wet and disappointed,” said Camacho, who believes that contaminated waterways on top of all the other habitat changes have driven the Sehuencas water frog close to extinction. “Then I said, ‘Let’s do one more creek.'”

Suddenly, Camacho and her team heard a tiny splash and noticed some movement in the water. They reached for the creature right away but alas: it was an entirely different species of frog.

However, not all hope was lost. That frog jumped away, leading the team to a tiny waterfall. There, underneath the stream of a little crashing wave, researchers saw a brown frog with big green eyes and an orange belly.

Unfortunately, this frog would not be Romeo’s partner in repopulating the species. While this little fella could’ve been great company to the museum loner, he was a male! Still, this meant there were more Sehuencas out there. There was hope to finding Romeo a Juliet.

The next day, the crew returned to the creek one more time and… bingo! They managed to catch four more frogs: two males and two females. While three of them were too young to reproduce, one female was exactly the right age. Now all they needed was some chemistry…

Although Romeo found no luck in online dating, this adult female could very well be the one. Could his life of isolation finally be over? It was a tough call because she had a completely opposite personality from Romeo’s!

“Romeo is really calm and relaxed and doesn’t move a whole lot,” Camacho Badini told BBC. Juliet, she said, was “really energetic, she swims a lot and she eats a lot and sometimes she tries to escape.”

On Valentine’s Day of 2019, the two love frogs would be set up on their very first “date” in the hopes of procreating and saving their entire species. No pressure, though, right?

If their personalities weren’t compatible, the looks could be all they needed. “She has beautiful eyes,” Alcide d’Orbigny Museum Director Ricardo Céspedes said about Juliet, who was quarantined until lab tests come back.

Scientists needed to make sure she was free of the dangerous chytrid fungus — known to have killed entire frog populations — before she met Romeo. Otherwise, she could’ve done much more harm than good!

Romeo was actually quite shy, didn’t swim much, and was “a little overweight” but that could change! “We’ll have to provide some sort of current to get him a little more exercise,” Camacho said.

If Romeo didn’t get kissed and turned into a prince, there were always a few other solutions: the biologists could attempt in-vitro-fertilization or rely on the younger frogs to breed when they were ready.

The Bolivian Museum of Natural History has previously succeeded in preserving the rare Titicaca frog, so if anyone is up to saving the Sehuencas, it’s these well-trained experts.

Now all there was left to do was wait for Valentine’s Day and see whether the Montague-Capulet romance would bloom. At least for now, Romeo no longer has to live in solitude, and there’s gonna be one less lonely frog.

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